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The Complete Holiday Fire Safety Guide

The Complete Holiday Fire Safety Guide

Holiday fire safety is rarely the first thing that comes to mind before any of our standard annual celebrations. For the most parwe simply think about holidays as a time of joy, togetherness, and reflection. These events conjure up images of family meals, parties, fireworks, BBQs, and traveling.

But as jovial as these gatherings are they are still a situation where holiday fire safety should be considered and is extremely important.


According the U.S Fire Administration1 there are some very basic facts about fires that if known can help dramatically reduce the number of fire deaths each year.

Believe it or not it takes less than 30 seconds for a small flame to get completely out of control. In less time then it takes to go to the bathroom you could have a major fire on your hands. Within minutes your house could be filled with thick, black, toxic smoke while your house continues to be engulfed in flames.

Keep in mind that direct flames are not the only danger in a fire. The surrounding heat can often be more dangerous. At floor level room temperatures can be 100 degrees and rise to as much as 600 degrees at eye level. This kind of heat can melt clothes to your skin, scorch your lungs, and even spontaneously ignite everything in the room.

And while the heat of the flames is very dangerous, more people are killed by the smoke and toxic gases that result from fires. Since fires use up the available oxygen in the room you can quickly be overwhelmed by black smoke and poisonous gases. Breathing even small amounts of this smoke and gas can make you drowsy, disoriented, and short of breath. Sometimes these gases are odorless and colorless and without a carbon monoxide detector you may not even notice them taking affect.

Because of these simple facts it is paramount that you always practice holiday fire safety so that you and your family remain safe from the dangers of a fire.

The Complete Holiday Fire Safety Guide

Below you’ll find everything there is to know about fire safety during the holidays. To skip to any section simply click on the link below.

Holiday Fire Statistics

Holiday Fire Safety Tips By Hazard

Holiday Fire Safety Tips By Holiday

Holiday Fire Statistics

Basic Holiday Fire Statistics

Basic Holiday Fire Statistics

Holidays, no matter what time of year, are meant to bring friends and family together. And although accidents and fires happen year round, we’ve found that many of the causes can be traced to specific holidays.

For example, holiday and other decorative lights play a major role when it comes to holiday fires at the end of the year. They were directly involved in an average of 150 home fires per year, resulting in an average of 9 deaths, 16 civilian injuries, and $8.4 million in property damage.

Most often these lights started with a Christmas Tree.

Leading Items First Ignited In Holiday Light Home Structure Fires

So it’s not surprising that certain causes for fires are more prominent during certain months. Christmas tree fires are most common in December and January while Firework fires are obviously more common in July.In fact, July 4th fireworks account for two out of five of all reported fires, more than any other cause.

Christmas Fire Statistics

Christmas Fire Statistics

Skip to Christmas Fire Safety

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)2 estimates that there is an annual average of 210 home structure fires that started with a Christmas tree. Between 2002 and 2005, these cChristmas tree fires caused an average of 24 deaths, 27 injuries, and $13.3 million in property damage per year.

An analysis of the data also shows that although the number of Christmas tree fires is low compared to the 30 million natural Christmas trees sold each year, these fires account for a much higher level of hazard.

On average 1 of every 9 Christmas tree fires resulted in a fatality compared to an average of one death per 75 home structure fires overall.  Further, 49% of Christmas tree fires spread beyond the room of origin.  The fires that spread beyond the room of origin caused 94% of the associated fatalities.

A more recent study done by the NFPA3 focusing on the period between 2007 and 2011 found that:

  • U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated annual average of 230 home fires that began with Christmas trees. Home Christmas tree fires caused an average of 6 civilian deaths, 22 civilian injuries, and $18.3 million in property damage per year.

This news is bittersweet since it represents a decrease of injuries and deaths but an increase in total Christmas tree fires and property damage. Holiday Fire Safety: % Injuries to Deaths Comparison Chart

According to the most recent study:

  • One of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires resulted in a death compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires.
  • December and January topped the list with 43% and 39% of annual Christmas tree fires respectively. This shows that Christmas tree fires are more likely after Christmas than before. For example, none of the ten dates with the largest shares of home Christmas tree structure fires were before Christmas.
  • Electrical failures or malfunctions were involved in one-third (32%) of the home Christmas tree structure fires. One in six (17%) occurred because some type of heat source was too close to the tree. Decorative lights on line voltage were involved in 12% of these incidents. 7% of home Christmas tree fires were started by candles.
  • 20% of home Christmas tree fires were intentionally set. Half of the intentional Christmas tree fires occurred in the 20 days after Christmas ending January 14th.

You can view the full report by clicking here.

In addition, holiday or other decorative lights with line voltage were involved in an average of 150 home structure fires per year, resulting in an average of 9 deaths, 16 civilian injuries, and $8.4 million in property damage.

Most often these fires started with a Christmas Tree.

Hanukkah Fire Statistics

Hanukkah Fire Statistics

Skip to Hanukkah Fire Safety

Similar to other winter holidays, Hanukkah has it’s own fair share (and similar) fire hazards that should be considered and planned for. Candles and electrical lights seem to be the major causes of fires during Hanukkah becuase of holiday decorations and lit Menorahs.

According to FEMA1, more than half (56%) of home candle fires occur when something that can catch on fire is too close to the candle. This can include other decorations, holiday cards, curtains, ribbons, or even clothing.

Although these numbers are not specific to Hanukkah, they are specific to the winter holiday season. December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December, 11% of home candle fires began with decorations compared to 4% the rest of the year.

And for those that use an electric Menorah, electrical fire hazards are still a very real possibility with3:

  • An estimated average of 150 home fires,
  • 9 deaths,
  • 16 injuries,
  • and $8.4 million in property damage per year

Halloween Fire Statistics

Halloween Fire Statistics

Skip to Halloween Fire Safety

Halloween is another decoration heavy holiday where fire prevention and safety is very important. Candles are lit to create sinister shadows and frightening situations. Both candles and electric lights are used to create an eerie glow in a pumpkin’s mouth.

According to FEMA5, between 2009 and 2011 an estimated 11,300 fires were reported over the three-day period around Halloween and caused an estimated 30 deaths, 175 injuries and $96 million in property loss.

It’s also interesting to note that the incidents involving fatalities and injuries was higher for Halloween fires versus non-Halloween fires. Halloween fires accounted for an average of 2.4 fatalities per 1,00 fires compared to 2.0 for non-Halloween fires. Injuries averaged 12.6 per 1,000 fires versus 10.6 during non-Halloween fires.

In terms of where Halloween fires happened, most (42%) happened outside followed by inside residential homes (31%). Unfortunately residential Halloween fires resulted in the most deaths (79%), injuries (74%) and property loss (64%). This is not surprising considering that there are much easier and safer evacuation options while outside as well as property in harms way.

Overall the leading causes of Halloween residential fires was Cooking at 43% (Have you read Everything You Need To Know About Kitchen Fire Safety) and heating at 15%.

4th of July Fire Statistics

4th of July Fire Statistics

Skip to 4th of July Fire Safety

According to the NFPA’s Fireworks report6 7, some 9,600 fireworks-related injuries were treated in U.S. hospital emergency rooms.

Of those injuries, in 2011 26% were under the age of 15 and two thirds (68%) of all firework related injuries were male.

Three of five (61%) fireworks injuries in 2011 were to extremities including:

  1. Hand or finger (46%),
  2. Eyes (17%)
  3. Head, face, ears (17%)
  4. Leg (11%), and
  5. Arm, shoulder, or wrist (4%).

Most of these were minor burns.

In 2011, 89% of emergency room fireworks injuries involved fireworks that are considered safe and often legal. But over all the percentage of injuries by firework type is:

  • 17%: Sparklers
  • 14%: Reloadable Shells
  • 13%: Firecrackers
  • 7%: Roman Candles
  • 6%: Bottle Rockets
  • 6%: Novelties
  • 2%: Multiple Tubes
  • 1%: Fountains
  • 3%: Public Display
  • 29%: Unspecified

An estimated 17,800 reported fires were started by fireworks in 2011. These fires resulted in an estimated 40 civilian injuries$32 million in property damage, and 0 reported fire deaths.

Over the period from 2007 to 2011 there was an average of 19,700 fires attributed to fireworks; 91% of which happened outside. They often involved:

  • Grass (6,800),
  • Brush (4,500),
  • Dumpsters (1,700),
  • Unclassified vegetation (1,300), and
  • Other outside trash, rubbish, or waste fires (1,200).

On Independence Day in a typical year, fireworks account for two out of five of all reported fires, more than any other cause of fire.

You can read the full report here.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)7 did a study in 2011 that found that on average, 200 people make an emergency room visit every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month surrounding Independence Day.

Grill fires are also very common during summer months, especially in July. According to the NFPA8 July was the top month for grill fire incidents at a whopping 17%. May, June, and August came in second at 13% each.

Home Grill Fires by Month 2007-2011

In 2012, 16,900 patients went to emergency rooms because of injuries involving grills.

Based on type of grill, four out of five (82%) grill house fires during 2007-2011 were fueled by gas while only 16% used charcoal or other solid fuel sources. These gas grills were involved in an average of 7,200 home fires per year, broken down to  include 3,000 structure fires and 4,200 outdoor fires annually.

One of every six (16%) home structure fires where grills were involved were caused by something flammable being too close to the grill.

Thanksgiving Fire Statistics

Thanksgiving Fire Statistics

Skip to Thanksgiving Fire Safety

According to the NFPA8 Thanksgiving was by far the peak day for home fires involving cooking equipment. Between 2007 and 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated average of 156,600 home structure fires  resulting from cooking equipment which annually accounted for 400 deaths, 5,080 injuries, and over $800 million in property damage.

Among all those cooking fires, Thanksgiving was the leading day for cooking fires with three times (3x) as many cooking fires as any other average day.

Deep frying turkeys , which involves heating cooking oil to 350 degrees or more, is also an extremely dangerous activity during Thanksgiving.

During 2007-2011, deep fryers caused an average of 800 home cooking fires per year, 30 injuries, and $17 million in property damage.

Holiday Fire Safety Tips By Hazard

Basic Holiday Fire Safety

Basic Holiday Fire Safety

By following a few basic holiday fire prevention tips you can help keep your home and family safe.

  • Make sure you have a serviced fire extinguisher on each floor and near the kitchen.
  • Make sure all smoke alarms are in proper working order
  • Make sure you have a plan if a fire does start
  • Make sure children understand what to do and not to do during a fire

Fireplace Fire Safety

Fireplace Fire Safety

The family fireplace is a place of joy and comfort. Follow the below simple rules and you will make sure your fireplace area does not become a danger to you or your family.

Some simple rules to remember include:

  • Make sure that your fireplace was CONSTRUCTED FOR ACTUAL USE and not simply decoration.
  • Be sure it has ADEQUATE PROTECTIVE LININGS and smoke ducts and that the chimney is clear and in good repair.
  • If you are using a factory-made fireplace, make sure IT ISN’T NEAR ANY COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS and has adequate flame and heat barriers.
  • OPEN THE VENT before starting the fire and keep it open until ALL ASHES ARE COOL.
  • NEVER GO TO SLEEP with the fire still going.
  • NEVER USE gasoline, propane, charcoal lighter or other fuel sources to light or relight a fire
  • NEVER KEEP FLAMABLE FUELS NEAR A FIRE
  • DO NOT USE coal or charcoal in a fireplace because of the danger of carbon monoxide build-up.
  • NEVER USE TRASH OR WRAPPINGS since some products can generate deadly fumes and flying paper embers could cause fires elsewhere
  • DO NOT TREAT ARTIFICIAL LOGS LIKE REAL LOGS. Artificial logs are usually made of sawdust and wax and have special burning properties.
  • READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS on artificial logs and follow them carefully.
  • At most, USE ONE LOG AT A TIME and do not add another log until the fire is completely out.
  • NEVER ADD AN ARTIFICIAL LOG TO A NATUREAL WOOD FIRE that is already burning for less than two hours.
  • Home-rolled newspaper logs SHOULD NEVER BE SOAKED IN FLAMMABLE FUELS of any kind because of the severe danger of explosion.
  • DO NOT OVERLOAD the fireplace. Large fires can lead to overheating, fires, and cause damage to the walls and roof.
  • ALWAYS USE A SCREEN around the fireplace to keep sparks and free floating embers from flying out.
  • KEEP CHILDREN AWAY from the fireplace when in use.
  • KEEP FLAMABLE MATERIALS AWAY FROM THE FIREPLACE such as: carpets, pillows, furniture or papers.0
  • Be sure that the CHRISTMAS TREE is close enough to be ignited by a spark.
  • ALWAYS MAKE SURE THE FIRE IS COMPLETELY OUT before retiring for the night or when leaving the house and fireplace unaccompanied.

Firework Fire Safety

Firework Fire Safety

Even though some fireworks seem harmless like sparklers, they are anything but. Sparklers can burn as hot as 1,200 degrees which is 30% hotter then it takes to melt glass.

  • The safest way to enjoy fireworks is a local professionally run event or viewing
  • Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities.
  • Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.
  • Back up to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not ignited fully.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Know where the nearest fire extinguisher is
  • Light fireworks one at a time, then move back quickly.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding it to prevent a trash fire.
  • Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.

Fire Pit Fire Safety

Fire Pit Fire Safety

Fire pits are unique in that they are almost always outdoors. This presents some challenges since embers can easily escape it’s enclosure.

  • Only use fuel appropriate for an outdoor fire (no gasoline)
  • Avoid using light materials like newspaper to burn since embers can fly out
  • Never lead the fire unattended
  • Put out the fire and douse the embers with water until completely cool
  • Know where the closest fire extinguisher is
  • Never burn trash or garbage
  • Keep loose clothing items away from the fire
  • Make sure kids and pets stay safely away from the fire pit
  • Never allow children to light or the fire
  • Always make sure there is adult supervision when children are near the fire
  • Keep the fire pit away from brush, grass, trees, and other flammable materials
  • Never pour alcohol onto the flames

Candle Fire Safety

Candle Fire Safety

Candles can be beautiful decorations but as an open flame in the house they come with their won fire hazards. According to the National Candle Association9:

  • Never leave a burning candle unattended. Extinguish all candles before leaving or going to sleep.
  • Never burn a candle on or near anything that is flammable. Keep burning candles away from furniture,curtains,  drapes, bedding, carpets, books, paper, flammable decorations, holiday cards, etc.
  • Keep burning candles out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Always use a candle-holder specifically designed for candle use. The holder should be heat resistant, solid, and big enough to contain any drips or melted wax.
  • Be sure the candle-holder is placed on a stable, heat-resistant surface.
  • Keep burning candles away from drafts, vents, ceiling fans and air currents. Drafts can also blow nearby lightweight items into the flame where they could catch fire.
  • Always burn candles in a well-ventilated room. Don’t burn too many candles in a small room or enclosed area without proper ventilation.
  • Don’t burn a candle all the way down. Extinguish the flame if it comes too close to the holder or container.
  • Never touch or move a burning candle. Extinguish it before moving.
  • Use a snuffer to extinguish a candle. It’s the safest way to prevent hot wax splatters.
  • Never extinguish candles with water. The water can cause the hot wax to splatter and might cause a glass container to break.
  • Be very careful if using candles during a power outage. Flashlights and other battery-powered lights are safer sources of light during a power failure.
  • Extinguish a candle if it repeatedly smokes, flickers, or the flame becomes too high.  The candle isn’t burning properly. Cool, trim the wick, then check for drafts before relighting.
  • Never use a candle as a night light.

Cooking Fire Safety

Cooking Fire Safety

Cooking is the #1 cause of home fires every year. Because of this it is also the greatest opportunity to drastically improve the safety of your home, family, and guests. If a kitchen fire does occur:

  • DO NOT USE WATER to douse a GREASE fire.
  • DO NOT use a WET TOWEL to put out a GREASE fire.
  • DO NOT MOVE the pan OFF THE STOVE.
  • DO NOT use a WATER BASED fire extinguisher.
  • Use a DRY CHEMICAL fire extinguisher for GREASE fires.
  • When using the fire extinguisher simply pull the pin, AIM AT THE GREASE FIRE and pull the handle.
  • If the flame is SMALL, USE A LID to smother the flame and TURN OFF the heat.
  • DO NOT REMOVE THE LID!
  • Once a kitchen fire starts, you have 30 SECONDS TO ONE MINUTE TO EXTINGUISH THE FIRE before it gets more serious.
  • If the fire gets out of control CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY.
  • HAVE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER that has an A B or C rating.

Christmas Tree Fire Safety

Christmas Tree Fire Safety

When it comes to Christmas trees the best thing you can do for safety is fire prevention. Keeping your tree fully watered can help drastically reduce the fire hazard each tree represents.

Picking The Tree

  • Consider an ARTIFICIAL Christmas tree this year since they are often flame resistant and fire retardant.
  • Always make sure the pre-cut tree you use is FRESHLY CUT with needles that are green, pliable, and firmly attached to the branches.
  • A fresh Christmas trees’ trunk should be sticky to the touch.
  • JUST IN CASE, re-cut the trunk at least two inches above the old cut to allow it to pull moisture in.
  • USE THE TAP TEST on any tree you are thinking about buying. Bounce the tree trunk on the ground and if a lot of needles fall off…move on since the tree is not fresh and a potential fire hazard.
  • AVOID getting a Christmas tree too early. If it is up for more than 2 weeks it could be a big fire safety hazard

Placing The Tree

  • Be sure to use a proper Christmas tree stand to avoid the tree falling over.
  • Fill the stand with water IMMEDIATELY.
  • Check the water level DAILY to ensure the tree does not get dry
  • NEVER place your Christmas tree close to a heat source (heater, oven, etc) or an open flame (candles, fireplace, etc).
  • Always keep the tree stand FILLED WITH WATER
  • Make sure the tree is not BLOCKING an exit

Lighting The Tree

  • ONLY use lights that have the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
  • Make sure you use the proper types of lights (some lights are ONLY for indoor or outdoor use.)
  • REPLACE any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections.
  • Connect NO MORE than three strands of mini string sets and a maximum of 50 bulbs for screw-in bulbs.
  • NEVER USE lit candles to decorate a tree.
  • Always TURN OFF Christmas tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.

Disposing Of The Tree

  • DISPOSE of your Christmas tree at a recycling center or at a local community drop off area.
  • NEVER DISPOSE of your tree in your stove, fire place, fire pit, or BBQ.

Deep Fried Turkey Fire Safety

Deep Fried Turkey Fire Safety

Overall it is NOT recommended for you to deep fry a turkey. Watch this video to understand why.


 If you must deep fry your turkey, be sure to follow the below fire prevention tips.

  • Make sure you have sturdy turkey fryer since most can easily tip over
  • AVOID OVERFILLING your cooking pot since it can easily spill over and start a fire.
  • REMEMBER that even a SMALL AMOUNT of cooking oil can cause a hot burner to catch fire.
  • If possible BUY A DEEP FRYER with thermostat controls to avoid overheating.
  • REMEMBER that the sides of the cooking pot or deep fryer, lid, and handles can get dangerously HOT.
  • NEVER leave the deep fryer unattended. If you need to leave the room, TURN OFF the fryer/heat.
  • NEVER allow children to operate or use the deep fryer.
  • Keep any flammable materials AWAY from the fryer.
  • Keep pets away from the deep fryer to avoid accidentally knocking it over
  • Always wear APPROPRIATE clothing while cooking.

BBQ & Grill Fire Safety

BBQ & Grill Fire Safety

Barbecues and Grills are the leading causes of outdoor home cooking fires which is why it’s important to follow some basic fire safety rules when using them.

  • Propane and charcoal BBQ grills should ONLY be used outdoors.
  • The grill should be placed FAR ENOUGH away from walls, deck railings, trees, bushes, or overhanging branches to avoid potential fire.
  • Keep children and pets AWAY from the grill area.
  • Keep your grill CLEAN by removing grease or fat buildup from the grills and in trays below the grill.
  • Never leave a lit grill UNATTENDED.
  • HAVE A FIRE EXTINGUISHER that has an A B or C rating.

Holiday Decoration Fire Safety

Holiday Decoration Fire Safety

Below are a few quick and easy tips that will help keep your family, holidays, and home safe from preventable fires.

  • Use holiday decorations that are flame resistant or flame retardant.
  • Keep all decorations away from open flames and heat sources
  • Read the instructions and follow manufacturer safety instructions
  • DO NOT overload electrical outlets
  • Make sure ALL electrical cords have no frayed/cracked or broken wires and sockets.
  • DO NOT attempt to repair any broken electrical cords on your own (unless you are certified to do such thing)
  • If your holiday decorations show any signs of needed repair THROW THEM AWAY and buy new ones.
  • Make sure that any holiday decorations do not INTERFERE WITH SAFETY EXITS
  • Consider LED lights since they
  • Fire Alarms should be tested and cleaned often
  • Have a fire escape route planned and exercised.

And although these Christmas light safety tips are important keep in mind that falls are also a problem. A study 4 found that roughly 5,800 people per year were treated at hospital emergency rooms for falls associated with holiday decorations. This was most prevalent from November to January2.

Holiday Light Fire Safety

Holiday Light Fire Safety

  • CHECK YOUR LIGHTS every year before putting them up or plugging them in to make sure they are in good working order.
  • Make sure you are using INDOOR lights INDOORS and OUTSIDE lights OUTSIDE
  • DO NOT link more than three (3) light strands to any one electrical cord.
  • DO NOT leave lights turned on for long periods of time or unattended…TURN OFF all lights when you go to bed!
  • Be careful when hanging lights from high areas. Falls are very communit during the holidays.
  • If you see any FRAYED or DAMAGED lights or cords, DO NOT USE THEM

Gift Wrapping Fire Safety

Gift Wrapping Fire Safety

You wouldn’t think something as common and unassuming as wrapping paper to be a fire hazard but the fact remains that it is still a very real danger. Kids are especially vulnerable to this type of holiday fire safety risk.

  • DO NOT BURN wrapping paper because it could release toxic fumes and embers can float around the house
  • Keep wrapping paper way from heat sources and open flames

Holiday Fire Safety Tips By Holiday

Hanukkah Fire Safety

Hanukkah Fire Safety

Hanukkah is called “The Festival of Lights” and should never be anything except a time of peace and love for family and friends. Most often Hanukkah fire safety revolves around gift wrapping, fire place, candle, light, decoration and cooking fire safety.

Christmas Fire Safety

Christmas Fire Safety

Christmas fire safety most often revolves around Christmas tree,  gift wrapping, fire place, candle, light, decoration and cooking fire safety.

Halloween Fire Safety

Halloween Fire Safety

The only scary parts about Halloween should be the ghost and goblins oaming the streets for candy.

The best Halloween fire prevention tips revolve around candle, light, decoration and cooking fire safety.

Thanksgiving Fire Safety

Thanksgiving Fire Safety

Thanksgiving day is the #1 day for home cooking fires and the greatest opportunity for practicing general kitchen fire safety.

Most often the best fire safety tips involve fire place, decoration, and cooking, especially deep fried turkey, fire safety. 

4th of July Fire Safety

4th of July Fire Safety

Independence day, and all summer holidays, are a great time to soak in the sun and parties. In order to stay fire safe you should practice basic fire prevention tips around fire pits, fireworks, cooking, grilling fire safety.

In Closing

We hope that the information contained above helps keep you and your family safe. If you ever have any questions, comments, suggestions feel free to visit the contact page and let us know how we can help. Whether that is basic fire safety tips or finding the perfect fire extinguisher service provider, we at FXSF.com are here to help.

Enjoy your holidays…safely!

~ FXSF Team

References:

  1. http://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/holiday.html
  2. http://fire.nist.gov/tree_fire.htm
  3. http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/Files/Research/NFPA%20reports/Major%20Causes/oschristmastrees.pdf
  4. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5348a1.htm
  5. http://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/statistics/snapshot_halloween.pdf
  6. http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/Files/Research/NFPA%20reports/Major%20Causes/osfireworks.pdf
  7. http://blog.usa.gov/post/26499127736/firework-injury-stats-and-safety-tips
  8. http://www.nfpa.org/~/media/Files/Research/NFPA%20reports/Major%20Causes/oscooking.pdf
  9. http://candles.org/fire-safety-candles/candle-safety-rules/

Want to know more about holiday fire safety?


April 23, 2017
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